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JB/104/275/001

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In progress. Last edited by Phil.fawcet

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1819 Aug. 14
Fallacies

Ch. Logical High-fliers
§. 1. Purveyors

1

In very early days the influence of capable of being exercised by names or opinions
and affections was not unknown, and practice — even
legislative practice — was grounded on it. In the days of
Edward the first, whatsoever was wanted for the King's use
including the use of all persons specially attached to his service,
a set of officers, appointed for that purpose, took it wherever
it was to be found, paying their own price for it.[I]
[I] In the French, which was Court language
of those days,

Of These
men like purchasers or buyers had become distinguished,[+]
(for very necessary
it was had become that they should
be distinguished)
distinguished from
other ordinary purchasers

from other
purchasers, by the name of purveyors, a name
which changeable in the mode of spelling as were most
names in those days but which settled at last into that
which has descended now still remains still attached to the office
though happily not with equal powers — purveyors: pour
-voyeurs: persons who "for" the King, were to "see" what there was to be had.
In such sort had these official persons busied themselves in the
exercise of this their duty, that they and their office had
become universally "odious". Complaints poured in to the
throne of the King's Most Excellent Majesty from his loving subjects.
His Majesty, such was his grace and condescension,
vouchsafed relief: and the relief consisted in a
statutory enactment, declaring that for the future these necessary
servants should no longer be called by the name of purveyors
+ 2.3.c.
a name which it was is observed had become "hacuous" (odious)
but by the name of acators: a name word which corresponding from its vicinity
as it does to the modern French word acheteurs appears to have been the
name by which buyers at large were designated in the
fashionable language.

In the Red book it still is along with the word Purveyors
used to figure and probably does still the word Caterers: a variety of the above word
Acator.




Identifier: | JB/104/275/001
"JB/" can not be assigned to a declared number type with value 104.

Date_1

1819-08-14

Marginal Summary Numbering

Box

104

Main Headings

fallacies

Folio number

275

Info in main headings field

fallacies

Image

001

Titles

Category

text sheet

Number of Pages

1

Recto/Verso

recto

Page Numbering

c1

Penner

jeremy bentham

Watermarks

[[watermarks::i&m [with prince of wales feathers above] 1818]]

Marginals

Paper Producer

arthur wellesley, duke of wellington

Corrections

Paper Produced in Year

1818

Notes public

ID Number

34246

Box Contents

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