xml:lang="en" lang="en" dir="ltr">

Transcribe Bentham: A Collaborative Initiative

From Transcribe Bentham: Transcription Desk

Keep up to date with the latest news - subscribe to the Transcribe Bentham newsletter; Find a new page to transcribe in our list of Untranscribed Manuscripts

JB/149/236/001

Jump to: navigation, search
Ready for review. Submitted by Kdownunder

Click Here To Edit

Language

1. Laxity. From what
imperfections in the choice
and arrangement of words
ambiguity and obscurity
take their rise has been
shewn in the chapter on
the qualities desirable in
language.

2. Fumbling is the natural
result and thence a symptom
of want of preparation.

When the field which a
man has to travel over
is new to him he finds
himself under the necessity
of his picking up as he
goes the asser opinions
which he sees reason to
deliver and the expressions
which in the delivery he
makes use of. The consequence
is that no sooner
has he picked up and
pitched upon one opinion
and clothed in such an
expression as at the moment
have presented themselves
than he finds that
in one way or other they
are deficient in respect
of completeness and
correctness. Then come
clause after clause having
for their object producing
the effect of amplification
reservation, modification
by words indicative of
additive substractive
substitutions we

Besides and again
and then too and
moreover: – it is by
words of this sort that
the symptoms of weakness
here called fumbling
is portrayed.

In some cases the seat of
the disease may be found
in single terms: in other
cases the whole proposition
the whole paragraph and
the whole discourse must
be examined before the
nature of the disease
becomes apparent and
thence the proper mode of
cure can be ascertained.


---page break---

Decarability
Provincipability

Signs in discourse
audible; visible and
their respective substitutes.

Impressiveness
In so far as time
future is the time
at which the purpose
is to be accomplished
and the portion of
the time in question
is remote; the
memory is the subject
on which the impression
requires to be made.
If it is on the passions
that any impression
is proposed to be
made the present
will be the portion
of time more particularly
looked to
for making it.
Impressiveness is
promoted by clearness.

Subject of discourse.
The only immediate
subject is the state
of the
communicative
mind.
State may be
active volitional faculty of passive.
If active the
discourse is either
a petition; or
request as a command. If
passive it will
be the perceptive
faculty, the retentive
(the memory) or
The judicial faculty
(the judgment).
If it be perceptive
the objects of
perception cannot
but be present
at the time of perception.


---page break---

Seldom is either the perceptive
or the retentive
faculty acted on
without an act of the
judicial faculty.

When a declaration is
expressed a persuasion
in some sort of other
is expressed.

The declared subject of
this persuasion will be
the state either of the
communicators own
mind or of some
exterior object or aggregation
of objects.

The time in relation to
which the object considered
will with referrence
to the time in which
the declaration is made
be past present or
future.

The exterior objects will
be persons or things.
The existence past or
present X of any
expressible state of
things or of persons or
of both at any given
point of time is
what is called a fact
or a matter of fact.

X The German style of
collocation would be
the past or present
state of existence:
but I put the subject
first and the modifications afterwards
as the mind is not
then kept in suspence
upon vague expressions.

In so far as the result
of the perceptions
the memory or the
judgment the existence
of which by the
communicator in question
is represented as
being the results of the
exercise not of his
own faculties but of
the faculties of some
other person the


---page break---

declaration is delivered
by the communicator
in question is called
a report.
In this case the
commun communicator only
declares the existence fact
of the report having
been made.

Displeasing is the
introduction of a
Foreign word when
an English would
suffice: taste &
relish are body
badly supplied.

Uncognotability.

Are


Identifier: | JB/149/236/001
"JB/" can not be assigned to a declared number type with value 149.

Date_1

Marginal Summary Numbering

Box

149

Main Headings

language

Folio number

236

Info in main headings field

language

Image

001

Titles

Category

rudiments sheet (brouillon)

Number of Pages

1

Recto/Verso

recto

Page Numbering

Penner

Watermarks

Marginals

Paper Producer

Corrections

Paper Produced in Year

Notes public

ID Number

50090

Box Contents

UCL Home » Transcribe Bentham » Transcription Desk